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Development of an effective AIDS vaccine is a global priority. However, the extreme diversity of HIV type 1 (HIV-1), which is a consequence of its propensity to mutate to escape immune responses, along with host factors that prevent the elicitation of protective immune responses, continue to hinder vaccine development. Breakthroughs in understanding of the biology of the transmitted virus, the structure and nature of its envelope trimer, vaccine-induced CD8 T cell control in primates, and host control of broadly neutralizing antibody elicitation have given rise to new vaccine strategies. Despite this promise, emerging data from preclinical trials reinforce the need for additional insight into virus-host biology in order to facilitate the development of a successful vaccine.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.chom.2016.02.002

Type

Journal article

Journal

Cell Host Microbe

Publication Date

09/03/2016

Volume

19

Pages

292 - 303

Keywords

AIDS Vaccines, Animals, Antibodies, Neutralizing, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Drug Discovery, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, HIV Antibodies, HIV-1, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Primates, Treatment Outcome