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RATIONALE: Pulmonary infection and malnutrition in cystic fibrosis are associated with decreased survival. Glutamine has a possible anti-microbial effect, with a specific impact against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We aimed to test the hypothesis that oral glutamine supplementation (21 g/day) for 8 weeks in adults with cystic fibrosis would decrease pulmonary inflammation and improve clinical status. METHODS: The study design was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study design with an iso-nitrogenous placebo. The primary analysis was intention to treat, and the primary outcome was change in induced sputum neutrophils. RESULTS: Thirty-nine individuals were recruited and thirty-six completed the study. Glutamine supplementation had no impact on any of the outcome measures in the intention-to-treat analysis. In the per protocol analysis, glutamine supplementation was associated with an increase in induced sputum neutrophils (P = 0.046), total cells (P = 0.03), and in Pseudomonas isolation agar colony forming units (P = 0.04) compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: There was no effect of glutamine supplementation on markers of pulmonary inflammation in the intention-to-treat analysis.

Original publication

DOI

10.1002/ppul.23370

Type

Journal article

Journal

Pediatr Pulmonol

Publication Date

03/2016

Volume

51

Pages

253 - 257

Keywords

cystic fibrosis, glutamine, infection, nutrition, Adult, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Cystic Fibrosis, Dietary Supplements, Double-Blind Method, Female, Glutamine, Humans, Male, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Respiratory Tract Infections, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult