Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
Skip to main content

BACKGROUND: Chlorproguanil-dapsone exerts lower resistance pressure on Plasmodium falciparum than does sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, but is rapidly eliminated. We aimed to find out whether chlorproguanil-dapsone results in a higher retreatment rate for malaria than sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. METHODS: In a randomised trial of paediatric outpatients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, patients received either chlorproguanil-dapsone or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and were followed up for up to 1 year. Sites were in Kenya (n=410) and Malawi (n=500). We used per-protocol analysis to assess the primary outcome of annual malaria incidence. FINDINGS: Drop-outs were 117 of 410 (28.5%) in Kenya, and 342 of 500 (68.4%) in Malawi. Follow-up was for a median of 338 days (IQR 128-360) and 342 days (152-359) in Kilifi (chlorproguanil-dapsone and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, respectively), and for 120 days (33-281) and 84 days (26-224) in Blantyre. Mean annual malaria incidence was 2.5 versus 2.1 in Kenya (relative risk 1.16, 95% CI 0.98-1.37), and 2.2 versus 2.8 in Malawi (0.77, 0.63-0.94). 4.3% versus 12.8%, and 5.4% versus 20.1%, of patients were withdrawn for treatment failure in Kenya and Malawi, respectively. In Kenya haemoglobin concentration of 50 g/L or less caused exit in 6.9% of chlorproguanil-dapsone patients and 1.5% of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine patients, but most anaemia occurred before re-treatment. In Malawi only one patient exited because of anaemia. INTERPRETATION: Despite the rapid elimination of chlorproguanil-dapsone, children treated with this drug did not have a higher incidence of malaria episodes than those treated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Treatment failure was more common with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Cause of anaemia in Kenya was probably not adverse reaction to chlorproguanil-dapsone, but this observation requires further study.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Lancet

Publication Date

12/10/2002

Volume

360

Pages

1136 - 1143

Keywords

Antimalarials, Cause of Death, Child, Preschool, Dapsone, Developing Countries, Drug Combinations, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Hemoglobinometry, Humans, Infant, Kenya, Malaria, Falciparum, Malawi, Male, Proguanil, Pyrimethamine, Recurrence, Retreatment, Sulfadoxine, Survival Rate