Seminars

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Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

To engage or involve? PE and PPI explored

Helen Adams

Helen Adams and Lynne Maddocks will explore the interface between engaging the public in your research and involving them. They will answer your questions on this relating to your specific projects.

Helen Adams and Lynne Maddocks will explore the interface between engaging the public in your research and involving them. They will answer your questions on this relating to your specific projects.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lynne Maddocks

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Genes wide open - A qualitative study to explore the motives, experiences and attitudes of individuals who openly share their genomic data

Tobias Haeusermann

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies (DTC-GT) market their service as tools for empowering consumers to make more informed and, arguably, better decisions about their health, wellness and lifestyle. Their business model, however, also entails collecting large privately owned genetic... Read more

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies (DTC-GT) market their service as tools for empowering consumers to make more informed and, arguably, better decisions about their health, wellness and lifestyle. Their business model, however, also entails collecting large privately owned genetic databases which can be exploited commercially. Openly sharing genetic and genomic data, in turn, carries highly valuable scientific yield and bears the potential to not only serve as a primary research tool for established scientists but also pave the way for participant-driven research initiatives. The aim of this study was to explore the motives, experiences and attitudes of individuals who openly share their DTC-GT results without any privacy protection and without institutional oversight on the non-profit platform openSNP. In this talk I will report the findings of a qualitative follow-up study to a structured questionnaire, with a view to support the further exploration of open genetic data sharing and its implications for genetic privacy and genomic utility.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Your Face Tomorrow: Prevention in the era of big data and miniaturized disease models

Professor Dr. Cornelia van Duijn is a professor of Genetic Epidemiology at the Erasmus University Medical Center and Translational Epidemiology at the University of Leiden. For over 25 years, her work has focused on discovering genes involved in age related disorders including Alzheimer disease,... Read more

Professor Dr. Cornelia van Duijn is a professor of Genetic Epidemiology at the Erasmus University Medical Center and Translational Epidemiology at the University of Leiden. For over 25 years, her work has focused on discovering genes involved in age related disorders including Alzheimer disease, glaucoma, dyslipidemia and hypertension. She has been a leading figure in various international genome wide association consortia including the International Genetics of Alzheimer Disease Project (IGAP) and the ADSP (Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project). At present, she combines genomics research with high-throughput metabolomics in large scale epidemiological biobanks and organ-on-chip models to translate finding to prevention and care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting immune regulation within tumours

Professor Sergio Quesada

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 22 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI , Headington OX3 7FZ

Common genetic variants and breast cancer risk

David Hunter

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 22 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

GU Medicine / Gastroenterology

Dr John Ryan, Dr Mamatha Pocock

GU Medicine: "Sexual health in the general medical take: two cases", Dr Mamatha Pocock -- Gastroenterology: "Alcohol Crisis in Oxford: ACT now", Dr John Ryan -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

GU Medicine: "Sexual health in the general medical take: two cases", Dr Mamatha Pocock -- Gastroenterology: "Alcohol Crisis in Oxford: ACT now", Dr John Ryan -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 22 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Room, George Pickering Education Centre, Headington OX3 9DU

'The role of DOT1L in MLL-AF4 leukaemia’

Laura Godfrey

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Emma Butterfield

Viva Seminar

Fri 23 Feb 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

When surgeons become patients: occupational health and wellbeing for doctors

Dr Evie Kemp

Dr Evie Kemp is the lead Occupational Health consultant at the Centre for Occupational Health and Wellbeing, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. She has a special interest in physician health and lectures and has run seminars on health and wellbeing for doctors in the UK, Europe and... Read more

Dr Evie Kemp is the lead Occupational Health consultant at the Centre for Occupational Health and Wellbeing, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. She has a special interest in physician health and lectures and has run seminars on health and wellbeing for doctors in the UK, Europe and North America. She is a member of the Faculty of Occupational Medicine Health for Health Professionals steering group, which coordinates enhanced competency training for Occupational Health physicians who see doctors as patients. She is also the Occupational Health physician for Oxford Deanery and sees junior doctors in need of support. Evie is qualified in cognitive behavioural therapy skills and is interested in the role of cognitive behaviour therapy in the Occupational Health consultation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 23 Feb 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Single cell deconvolution of the intestinal mesenchyme in inflammatory bowel disease

Dr Hannah Chen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 23 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Genes to clinic in an autoimmune disease

Professor John Todd

The JDRF/Wellcome Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics aims to identify and characterise type 1 diabetes risk regions of the human genome and use this information to identify disease mechanisms in order to target potential preventative and therapeutic... Read more

The JDRF/Wellcome Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics aims to identify and characterise type 1 diabetes risk regions of the human genome and use this information to identify disease mechanisms in order to target potential preventative and therapeutic strategies. Examples include enhancing immunomodulatory functions of the interleukin-2 pathway and preventing the loss of immune tolerance to insulin.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Mon 26 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Spatial Positioning of Innate Cells Controls B Cell Immunity to Infection

Dr Mauro Gaya

B cells are key elements of adaptive immunity because of their ability to produce highly specific antibodies in response to infection. Antibodies not only confer protection from pathogenic threats, but also are the basis for most currently licensed human vaccines. Despite their great importance for... Read more

B cells are key elements of adaptive immunity because of their ability to produce highly specific antibodies in response to infection. Antibodies not only confer protection from pathogenic threats, but also are the basis for most currently licensed human vaccines. Despite their great importance for public health, the precise events driving the initiation of antibody production are still unknown. During the seminar, I will discuss how the spatial positioning of innate immune cells, e.g. macrophages or innate-like T cells, controls the initiation of B cell immunity during bacterial and viral infection. ---- Dr Gaya graduated from the University of Buenos Aires in 2011. He then moved to UK to perform his PhD studies at the London Research Institute, where he investigated how viral and bacterial infection perturbs the organization of lymph node macrophages, leaving the organism temporarily exposed to secondary pathogens. He obtained his PhD in Immunology from the University College London in 2015. Dr Gaya continued his postdoctoral studies at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard under the supervision of Dr Facundo Batista. There, he studies how the spatial positioning of innate-like T cells controls the initiation of B cell immunity during infection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Research Seminar - Opportunities and challenges for using real world evidence (RWE) for surveillance, quality improvement and research

Professor Simon de Lusignan, Dr Harshana Liyange

Pregnancy ontology - Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Research and Surveillance Centre (RSC)

Pregnancy ontology - Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Research and Surveillance Centre (RSC)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, First Floor Main Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Carer and family effects in economic evaluation: an overview of recent research

Hareth Al-Janabi

Healthcare interventions will often affect the lives of carers and patients' family members. For example, treating symptoms of dementia is likely to reduce strain on family carers, while using out-of-area mental health care is likely to increase anxiety for the patient's wider family. These 'family... Read more

Healthcare interventions will often affect the lives of carers and patients' family members. For example, treating symptoms of dementia is likely to reduce strain on family carers, while using out-of-area mental health care is likely to increase anxiety for the patient's wider family. These 'family spillovers' represent potentially important benefits and costs of interventions that are typically neglected in economic evaluation. However, guidelines, from, for example NICE and the US panel on cost-effectiveness, recommend including family spillovers in economic evaluation. This seminar will outline recent research to develop (and apply) methods to do this. It will outline findings from (i) a qualitative study of the impact of patient care on family carers' lives; (ii) psychometric analysis of the validity of quality of life measures for use with carers in economic evaluation; and (iii) econometric and theoretical work to develop the multiplier approach to combining family spillovers with patient outcomes in economic evaluation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: HERC

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, First Floor Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

HERC Seminar - Carer and family effects in economic evaluation: An overview of recent research

Dr Hareth Al-Janabi

ABSTRACT Healthcare interventions will often affect the lives of carers and patients' family members. For example, treating symptoms of dementia is likely to reduce strain on family carers, while using out-of-area mental health care is likely to increase anxiety for the patient's wider family.... Read more

ABSTRACT Healthcare interventions will often affect the lives of carers and patients' family members. For example, treating symptoms of dementia is likely to reduce strain on family carers, while using out-of-area mental health care is likely to increase anxiety for the patient's wider family. These 'family spillovers' represent potentially important benefits and costs of interventions that are typically neglected in economic evaluation. However, guidelines, from, for example NICE and the US panel on cost-effectiveness, recommend including family spillovers in economic evaluation. This seminar will outline recent research to develop (and apply) methods to do this. It will outline findings from (i) a qualitative study of the impact of patient care on family carers' lives; (ii) psychometric analysis of the validity of quality of life measures for use with carers in economic evaluation; and (iii) econometric and theoretical work to develop the multiplier approach to combining family spillovers with patient outcomes in economic evaluation. BIOGRAPHY Hareth Al-Janabi is a senior lecturer in health economics and NIHR career development fellow at the University of Birmingham. His research focuses mainly on economic evaluation methodology and developing techniques to capture a broader range of benefits and costs. He has developed new techniques to measure and value informal care, family outcomes, and capability wellbeing (notably the ICECAP-A). Hareth uses a wide variety of research methods, including qualitative approaches (such as in-depth interviews, meta-ethnography, and cognitive interviews) and quantitative approaches (such as preference elicitation and econometrics).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Enhancers of Sonic hedgehog gene expression and making long distance relationships work

Professor Robert Hill

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 15:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Revisiting molecular subtyping in breast cancer: Gene mapping and beyond

Professor Nicola Camp

Nicola is a genetic epidemiologist, statistical geneticist and tenured professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah, USA. Her major focus is susceptibility gene mapping in complex disease and her research balances methods development and application to human studies,... Read more

Nicola is a genetic epidemiologist, statistical geneticist and tenured professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah, USA. Her major focus is susceptibility gene mapping in complex disease and her research balances methods development and application to human studies, particularly breast cancer and B-cell hematological malignancies. Her research has been funded for over 15 years by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Komen and Avon breast cancer Foundations and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society; beginning with a career development award from the NCI, and including a presidential award by Barack Obama for her innovative pedigree techniques. Her recent work has explored the revitalization of pedigree-based designs for complex disease through novel statistics, study designs, and the integration of tumor genomics. Nicola is a Huntsman Cancer Investigator (Cancer Center member) and co-leads the Women’s Cancers Disease Oriented Team, a multi-disciplinary team of over 50 cancer investigators. She serves on advisory boards for the Utah Population Database (UPDB) and the Utah Genome Project (UGP). The UPDB is a unique database that links a 5M-person genealogy to a statewide cancer registry and electronic medical records for the state. The UGP is a sequencing initiative largely based on pedigrees from the UPDB. She is active in multiple international consortia; has led the International Multiple Myeloma Consortium (2015-2016) and currently serves on the coordinating committee of the International Lymphoma Consortium. She also sits on the NCI’s Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology, which oversees rigorous scientific review and strategic planning of these NCI intramural programs. In addition to her primary appointment in Internal Medicine, Nicola is an adjunct professor in Human Genetics, Biomedical Informatics, and Family and Preventive Medicine, where she teaches and mentors trainees (MS, MSTAT, PhD, postdocs). She co-directs a recently redesigned campus-wide TL1 training program in clinical and translational science, STARS (Spheres of Translation Across the Research Spectrum), the goal of which is to produce a cadre of scholars with strategic translational emphases, knowledge breadth, and cross-discipline communication skills to increase transdisciplinary cross-fertilization and accelerate healthcare advances. In the era of big data, she is particularly enthusiastic to encourage quantitative undergraduates to consider graduate programs and research careers that will advance the fields in biostatistics, genetic epidemiology, and population health.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Growth Factor Sensing; a new paradigm in tumour and pathogen immunosurveillance

Alexander Barrow

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Wed 28 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

WEH Seminar: Long game health promotion and political legitimacy in public health law

Professor John Coggan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 28 Feb 2018 from 11:30 to 12:30

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Wed 28 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Title TBC

Lucy Dorrell

Audience: UK Science Community

Organisers: Ramona Kantschuster

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access