Seminars

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Mon 25 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Roles and Regulation of the eukaryotic replisome

Professor Karim Labib

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 25 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells

Dr Anke Roelofs

In recent years, skeletal stem cell populations have been identified in bone marrow and genetic lineage tracing models in mice have provided important insights in their roles in bone homeostasis, fracture repair, and haematopoiesis. More recently, the stem and progenitor cells that are resident in... Read more

In recent years, skeletal stem cell populations have been identified in bone marrow and genetic lineage tracing models in mice have provided important insights in their roles in bone homeostasis, fracture repair, and haematopoiesis. More recently, the stem and progenitor cells that are resident in synovial joints are also beginning to be defined and their functions elucidated. Work in our lab has focused on stem and progenitor cells in the synovial membrane, and has identified progeny of the Gdf5-expressing cells of the embryonic joint interzones as key players in joint homeostasis, repair and pathophysiology. ---- Anke Roelofs completed her MSc in Medical Biology at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands in 2003 cum laude. She then moved to the Botnar Research Centre at the University of Oxford to study for a PhD under the guidance of Prof Graham Russell and Drs Claire Edwards and Philippa Hulley, focussing on the mechanisms of action of bisphosphonates and related compounds. After completing her PhD in 2007 and following a number of post-doctoral research posts, she was appointed Lecturer at the University of Aberdeen in 2012, where she is part of the Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine laboratory within the Aberdeen Centre for Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Health. Her current research focusses on the study of the endogenous mesenchymal stromal cell lineages and their niches in the joint in health, after joint injury, and in osteoarthritis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 25 Jun 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Infections@BDI Seminar

Jason Hendry, Will Probert

Will Probert (Fraser): Artificial intelligence to aid decision-making in emergency disease outbreaks: reinforcement learning methods for the control of foot-and-mouth disease Jason Hendry (McVean): Estimating malaria prevalence from genomic data

Will Probert (Fraser): Artificial intelligence to aid decision-making in emergency disease outbreaks: reinforcement learning methods for the control of foot-and-mouth disease Jason Hendry (McVean): Estimating malaria prevalence from genomic data

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Tue 26 Jun 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - SIFT The Speed of Increasing milk Feeds Trial

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Manisha Nair

Tue 26 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Controlling mouse HSC function and myelopoiesis in vivo

Claudia Waskow

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 27 Jun 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Under pressure - do patients really want the responsibility of managing their own BP?

Dr Claire Schwartz

A quantitative and qualitative exploration of how patients really feel about monitoring their own blood pressure and managing their medications and discussion about whether they would be prepared to make this part of their lifestyle in the long-term.

A quantitative and qualitative exploration of how patients really feel about monitoring their own blood pressure and managing their medications and discussion about whether they would be prepared to make this part of their lifestyle in the long-term.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Wed 27 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Justice and vulnerability in big data

Angela Ballantyne

Data is powerful because it is used to tell stories – stories about people and the lives they lead. Data carries an appealing veneer of objectivity. But telling stories is never ethically neutral. Narratives always have embedded cultural values and ethical assumptions. Data analytics and... Read more

Data is powerful because it is used to tell stories – stories about people and the lives they lead. Data carries an appealing veneer of objectivity. But telling stories is never ethically neutral. Narratives always have embedded cultural values and ethical assumptions. Data analytics and artificial intelligence are increasingly used to influence decisions about service delivery and access (in both the public and private sectors). In this talk I argue that the most vulnerable and marginalized citizens often rely on multiple government services, experience the greatest surveillance of their activities, and therefore have the most data produced about them. But conversely, they often have the least capacity to influence the narratives that are drawn with this data and the resulting policies. To date, there has been significant discussion of data benefit sharing (ensuring the advantages/profits derived from the use of data are shared justly with the data providers and data subjects). I will discuss recent attempts, particularly in relation to indigenous data, to the move the debate from ‘benefit sharing’ towards ‘power sharing’. Power sharing requires a co-governance model where data subjects and communities have decision making capacity in relation to data governance and use.[1] I will describe recent initiatives in New Zealand, and argue in favour of transparency, accountability and co-governance models for public sector data. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 27 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Post-Truth Medicine: Death and Disability by Disinformation

Sir Rory Collins

Rory Collins studied Medicine at St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, London, and Statistics at George Washington University and Oxford University. He came to Oxford in 1981 to run the ISIS “mega-trials” which showed that emergency treatment of heart attacks with streptokinase and aspirin... Read more

Rory Collins studied Medicine at St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, London, and Statistics at George Washington University and Oxford University. He came to Oxford in 1981 to run the ISIS “mega-trials” which showed that emergency treatment of heart attacks with streptokinase and aspirin halves mortality. Subsequently, his focus has involved showing that lowering LDL-cholesterol safely reduces the risk of having heart attacks and strokes. In 1985, he became co-director (with Richard Peto) of the University of Oxford's Clinical Trial Service Unit & Epidemiological Studies Unit (CTSU). He was appointed BHF Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology in 1996, and Head of the Nuffield Department of Population Health in 2013. Rory became Principal Investigator of the UK Biobank prospective study of 500,000 people in 2005. He was elected to the Fellowship of the UK Academy of Medical Science in 2004 and the Royal Society in 2015, and knighted by the Queen for services to Science in 2011.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 28 Jun 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Characterising the Role of the Novel C-type lectin Receptor CD302 in Dendritic Cell Migration

Dr Pablo Silveira

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 28 Jun 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting room A , Headington OX3 7BN

"Structural insights into Potato Virus Y - a bad guy and a good guy"

Assist. Prof Marjetka Podobnik

Potato virus Y (PVY) is the type member of the genus Potyvirus, which includes some of the most destructive plant viruses. PVY has been placed on a Top 5 list of scientifically and economically important plant viruses, affecting potato, tomato, tobacco, pepper as well as ornamentals and weeds. PVY... Read more

Potato virus Y (PVY) is the type member of the genus Potyvirus, which includes some of the most destructive plant viruses. PVY has been placed on a Top 5 list of scientifically and economically important plant viruses, affecting potato, tomato, tobacco, pepper as well as ornamentals and weeds. PVY virions are assembled of a positive sense single stranded RNA, enveloped with approximately 2000 copies of a coat protein (CP) to form flexuous filaments 740 nm in length and 12 nm in diameter. Expression of recombinant CP in bacteria results in formation of self-assembled flexuous filaments called virus like particles (VLPs), which are devoid of viral RNA and thus non-infectious. In my talk I will show our recent results on near-atomic cryo-EM structures of both, PVY virions (‘bad guys’) and VLPs (‘good guys’), revealing unique structural features of PVY and significant differences between the two types of filaments. Furthermore, I will also discuss the potential of VLPs for use in (bio)technology.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Fri 29 Jun 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Genomic approaches to understanding the dysregulated host response in sepsis

Prof Julian Knight

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 29 Jun 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Rational Design of Artificial Genetic Switches

Professor Hiroshi Suguyama

To produce a genetic switch that turns on specific gene expression, we developed a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor conjugated to pyrrole–imidazole polyamide (PIP) that has remarkable properties such as sequence-specific DNA binding, effects on cell permeability, and nuclear localization. We... Read more

To produce a genetic switch that turns on specific gene expression, we developed a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor conjugated to pyrrole–imidazole polyamide (PIP) that has remarkable properties such as sequence-specific DNA binding, effects on cell permeability, and nuclear localization. We constructed a library of 32 types of PIP conjugates that bind to different base sequences and has evaluated gene expression using DNA microarray technology in mice and human cells. We demonstrated that upregulation of gene expression in different transcriptional networks is based on sequence specificity.1 To develop a genetic switch that turns off specific gene expression, we synthesized a functional PIP with a DNA alkylating agent. Our research group found that the functional polyamide targets the mutant (GTT) sequence of Kras codon 12, which is found in colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer where it effectively suppresses Kras expression.2 We confirmed the compound’s effectiveness in experiments using human colorectal cancer cells and tumor-bearing mice. We have also developed functional polyamides that inhibit the binding of RUNX family genes, which are among the key transcription factors responsible for tumor growth and are drug candidates for the treatment of leukemia, lung cancer, and stomach cancer.3 Therefore, strategies to expand our tunable PIPs could create an epoch-making approach to modulate the desired gene expressions. Recently, we installed cooperative binding host-guest unit to PIP and demonstrated potent cooperative inhibitory effects on gene expression under physiological conditions by disrupting transcription factors- DNA binding.4 In this talk recent progress of regulation of the gene expression using designed PIPs will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 29 Jun 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

SAMHD1 at the crossroads of nucleotide metabolism and cell death / High-Throughput Production of Human Proteins for Structural and Functional Analyses.

Prof Jan Rehwinkel, Dr Nicola Burgess Brown

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith